Invasive Weeds

Invasive weed control is a challenging natural resource issue in our district. The San Juan Basin Cooperative Weed Management Area has compiled resources here to help you manage weeds on your land.

The following map is all the invasive species inventory done by the Conservation District from January 1st 2016 to March 31st 2018. 

 

 

Infestations with an acreage and percent cover of 0 are small infestations that consisted of less than 10 plants. 

Links for homeowners and land managers:

NMSU Troublesome Weeds of New Mexico

NMSU herbicide use guide for weeds and brush
tells you which herbicides are effective on common weeds, as well as what time of year to spray and how much.

Common invasive weeds in NW New Mexico can be found below.
Click links for NMSU's Management Do's and Don'ts and plant information.

Bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare): biennial, infests disturbed areas
Management and information

Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense): perennial, infests disturbed areas
Management and information

Musk thistle (Carduus nutans): biennial, infests disturbed areas
Management and information

Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens): perennial, infests disturbed areas as well as croplands, fields, rangelands, and riparian areas
Management and information

Scotch thistle (Onopordum acanthium): biennial, infests disturbed areas as well as croplands, fields, rangelands, and riparian areas
Management and information

Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula): perennial, infests a wide range of soil types and habitats including roadsides, croplands, riparian areas, and pastures
Management and information

Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum): Annual grass, infests disturbed areas as well as croplands and rangelands
Management and information

Halogeton (Halogeton glomeratus): Annual, infests open, disturbed areas, arid areas, and alkaline soils, toxic to livestock
Management and information

Hoary cress/Whitetop (Cardaria spp.): perennial, infests moist areas like croplands and fields, as well as disturbed areas
Management and information

For information about other invasive weeds, including Russian olive and salt cedar/tamarisk, visit NMSU's
Troublesome Weeds of New Mexico home page.